Pre-Employment Agreements

On November 13, 2019 our Union filed a grievance (CHQ-rouge-19-75 Unreasonable Exercise of Management Rights and Human Rights- Pre-Employment Agreements) in relation to pre-employment agreements.  Click HERE to view the grievance form.

Unbeknownst to the Union, Air Canada had been asking new and prospective employees to sign an agreement prior to being hired. This pre-employment agreement asked the new hires to acknowledge and agree that as a condition of employment, they would not consume any narcotic or illicit drug. They would also agree that for a period of two years from their hiring date, they would be called randomly and would subject themselves to unannounced testing. If the test was positive, there would then be an evaluation by a substance abuse consultant and any failure to submit to testing would result in termination of their employment.

The Union feels very strongly about this case and the violations of Human Rights that stem from this agreement and its requirements. As such, we will be bringing this case forward to Level II.

It is our view that any terms in a pre-employment agreement between the Company and an individual does not survive the act of hiring the individual as a bargaining unit member and is not enforceable. Put in plain terms, it is our firm position that as soon as someone becomes a Union member they are no longer held to the terms of these agreements.

We are putting out a call to all members to ask that if you have been required to sign any pre-employment agreement regarding random drug and alcohol testing that you contact me at t.mitchell@accomponent.ca.

Here for you,

Theresa Mitchell
Vice-President, Air Canada Component of CUPE

Onboard Security

On multiple occasions, the Union has received reports of member’s personal items being stolen, removed, or relocated while onboard aircraft.

In June 2019, our Health and Safety Committee sent out a survey asking members to report incidents of this nature.  The response that we received was quite informative and it became clear to us that something must be done.

The Union brought this matter to the attention of Air Canada Management at a Union Management meeting on July 25, 2019.  After the meeting we followed up with a letter outlining the various occurrences in which our members were affected by the lack of a secure area for stowing personal belongings.  This letter outlined the following:

  • Our members may have medication in their luggage that they need for health reasons.
  • Our members have valuable identification in their luggage, including their RAIC, their passports, and their wallets, the removal of which can lead to security breaches and/or fraud.
  • Company documents required for safety (FAM and PELCs) can be in their luggage and they may need access to them.

No meaningful response was received from Air Canada.  The Union filed grievances CHQ-19-43 and CHQ-Rouge-19-59 (Click HERE to view the CHQ-19-43 grievance form & Click HERE to view the CHQ-Rouge-19-59 grievance form).

These grievances are moving through the normal course and we would like to ask for your help.  If you have experienced theft of personal belongings, or, if your belongings have been relocated or removed to your detriment, we would like to hear from you.  We ask that a statement be provided to the Union for the purposes of mediation/arbitration. If you are able to assist us with this we ask that you submit your statement to i.jovic@accomponent.ca.  Please note in the subject line “Personal Belongings”.

We rely on your input and statements to help us with policy grievances of this nature as it provides invaluable evidence for us.  We look forward to hearing from you.  If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out to me at t.mitchell@accomponent.ca.

Here for you,

Theresa Mitchell
Vice-President, Air Canada Component of CUPE

Pre-Employment Agreements

In April of 2018 our Union filed a grievance (CHQ-18-31 Unreasonable Exercise of Management Rights and Human Rights- Pre-Employment Agreements) in relation to pre-employment agreements.

Unbeknownst to the Union, Air Canada had been asking new and prospective employees to sign an agreement prior to being hired. This pre-employment agreement asked the new hires to acknowledge and agree that as a condition of employment, they would not consume any narcotic or illicit drug. They would also agree that for a period of two years from their hiring date, they would be called randomly and would subject themselves to unannounced testing. If the test was positive, there would then be an evaluation by a substance abuse consultant and any failure to submit to testing would result in termination of their employment.

The Union brought this case forward to Level II and it was subsequently denied. The Union feels very strongly about this case and the violations of Human Rights that stem from this agreement and its requirements.

It is our view that any terms in a pre-employment agreement between the Company and an individual does not survive the act of hiring the individual as a bargaining unit member and is not enforceable. Put in plain terms, it is our firm position that as soon as someone becomes a Union member they are no longer held to the terms of these agreements.

We are putting out a call to all members to ask that if you have been required to sign any pre-employment agreement regarding random drug and alcohol testing that you contact me at t.mitchell@accomponent.ca.

Here for you,

Theresa Mitchell
Vice-President, Air Canada Component of CUPE

Social Media Survey

Your Component Officers have created a brief survey regarding the use of Social Media. This survey is being sent out as a part of our short and long term communications strategy and is open to all members of the Air Canada Component of CUPE, both Mainline and Rouge. We would like to find out the best and most effective ways […]

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B1 Judicial Review

Today, a panel of the Divisional Court heard the union’s application for judicial review of arbitrator Steinberg’s B1 pass decision (CHQ-15-07).  You may recall that the arbitrator dismissed the union’s grievance which alleged that the company unreasonably broke a promise made in 2011 collective bargaining not to give the pilots a greater pass priority when […]

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